Canadian pot companies have lifted the lid on hiring

Canadian pot companies have lifted the lid on hiring

VANCOUVER–Canadian marijuana companies are on a hiring spree, looking to fill an array of roles as they gear up for the legalization of recreational cannabis later this year.

VANCOUVER–Canadian marijuana companies are on a hiring spree, looking to fill an array of roles as they gear up for the

The workforce is booming, said Alison McMahon, who runs Cannabis At Work, a staffing agency focused on the burgeoning industry.

Right now, she’s recruiting for positions in everything from growing and production to sales and marketing, all across the country.

Stigma may once have kept people from applying for work with a cannabis company, but those perceptions have shifted and people are now excited about the opportunities, McMahon said.

“I think that the people, at this point, who are looking at the industry and are excited really see the upside and the growth potential,” she said. “More and more people are open to this topic, so it doesn’t end up being that big of a deal.”

The buzz around Canadian pot is allowing companies to be picky and choose top talent, said Kerri-Lynn McAllister, chief marketing officer at Lift, a company that puts on cannabis events and runs a website sharing marijuana news and reviews.

is allowing companies to be picky and choose top talent, said Kerri-Lynn McAllister, chief marketing officer at Lift, a company that puts on cannabis events and runs a website sharing marijuana news and reviews.

“Because of all the excitement, it’s really an opportunity for companies to pick up the A-players in business or whatever field they’re operating in,” said McAllister, speaking from first-hand experience. She recently left a job in the financial tech sector to join Lift.

The industry has come out from the shadows recently, McAllister said, and that’s allowing companies to attract business executives, tech wizards and marketing masters who are at the top of their game.

Dozens of prospective employees came to meet McMahon and her staff at the Lift Cannabis Expo in Vancouver on Saturday, resumes in hand.

Grady Jay said he’s been growing for the underground industry for years. Now he wants to transition to working for the legal market.

Experience is part of what marijuana companies are looking for, particularly when it comes to production, McMahon said, noting that experience could come from working in a commercial greenhouse or the black market.

Successful applicants can expect to make salaries comparable to what similar industries offer, McMahon said. A general growing position would probably make about $50,000 per year, she said, while a director of production could expect around $100,000.

“Some people seem to think that because it’s cannabis and because of all the growth, the salaries are going to be so high,” McMahon said. “And that’s not the case. It’s a bit more mainstream around the salaries.”

“We can have a really great candidate with a great skill set, but if they haven’t looked into what’s happening with the industry at all . . . that can potentially be a bit of detriment,” McMahon said.

VANCOUVER–Canadian marijuana companies are on a hiring spree, looking to fill an array of roles as they gear up for the legalization of recreational cannabis later this year.

VANCOUVER–Canadian marijuana companies are on a hiring spree, looking to fill an array of roles as they gear up for the

The workforce is booming, said Alison McMahon, who runs Cannabis At Work, a staffing agency focused on the burgeoning industry.

Right now, she’s recruiting for positions in everything from growing and production to sales and marketing, all across the country.

Stigma may once have kept people from applying for work with a cannabis company, but those perceptions have shifted and people are now excited about the opportunities, McMahon said.

“I think that the people, at this point, who are looking at the industry and are excited really see the upside and the growth potential,” she said. “More and more people are open to this topic, so it doesn’t end up being that big of a deal.”

The buzz around Canadian pot is allowing companies to be picky and choose top talent, said Kerri-Lynn McAllister, chief marketing officer at Lift, a company that puts on cannabis events and runs a website sharing marijuana news and reviews.

is allowing companies to be picky and choose top talent, said Kerri-Lynn McAllister, chief marketing officer at Lift, a company that puts on cannabis events and runs a website sharing marijuana news and reviews.

“Because of all the excitement, it’s really an opportunity for companies to pick up the A-players in business or whatever field they’re operating in,” said McAllister, speaking from first-hand experience. She recently left a job in the financial tech sector to join Lift.

The industry has come out from the shadows recently, McAllister said, and that’s allowing companies to attract business executives, tech wizards and marketing masters who are at the top of their game.

Dozens of prospective employees came to meet McMahon and her staff at the Lift Cannabis Expo in Vancouver on Saturday, resumes in hand.

Grady Jay said he’s been growing for the underground industry for years. Now he wants to transition to working for the legal market.

Experience is part of what marijuana companies are looking for, particularly when it comes to production, McMahon said, noting that experience could come from working in a commercial greenhouse or the black market.

Successful applicants can expect to make salaries comparable to what similar industries offer, McMahon said. A general growing position would probably make about $50,000 per year, she said, while a director of production could expect around $100,000.

“Some people seem to think that because it’s cannabis and because of all the growth, the salaries are going to be so high,” McMahon said. “And that’s not the case. It’s a bit more mainstream around the salaries.”

“We can have a really great candidate with a great skill set, but if they haven’t looked into what’s happening with the industry at all . . . that can potentially be a bit of detriment,” McMahon said.

At Staub , the French cookware company, they call this a heritage braiser because it was inspired by one in their archives. It was originally made for chefs, and it is handsome enough to go from stove to table. The sloping 31/2-quart enameled cast iron vessel is extremely versatile and can cook paellas, risottos, frittatas, clams or mussels, in addition to braising meats and poultry. The lid, with its dimpled underside, helps the basting process. The pan is easy to clean, but not as easy to lift and carry, as it clocks in at about 14 pounds empty: Staub Heritage Braiser, Sur La Table, $199.96, 800-243-0852, surlatable.com .

, the French cookware company, they call this a heritage braiser because it was inspired by one in their archives. It was originally made for chefs, and it is handsome enough to go from stove to table. The sloping 31/2-quart enameled cast iron vessel is extremely versatile and can cook paellas, risottos, frittatas, clams or mussels, in addition to braising meats and poultry. The lid, with its dimpled underside, helps the basting process. The pan is easy to clean, but not as easy to lift and carry, as it clocks in at about 14 pounds empty:

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A version of this article appears in print on October 18, 2017, on Page D3 of the New York edition with the headline: To Simmer: A Heavyweight Pot For Festive Affairs. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

The chairwoman of the Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries board is defending the Crown corporation’s decision to employ a senior executive who does not live full-time in the province.

The chairwoman of the Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries board is defending the Crown corporation’s decision to employ a senior executive who does not live full-time in the province.

Polly Craik says Deanne Carson, hired in April as vice-president of marketing and communications, was the best possible person for the job.

“We went through a very thorough process,” Craik said Tuesday. “Deanne was absolutely the right selection for the position, and management did the hiring certainly with the support of the board.”

Carson, a former vice-president of marketing with the Calgary Stampede, spends her work week in Winnipeg and goes home on weekends to Alberta to be with her family. Liquor & Lotteries — which regulates gambling and the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages in Manitoba — says she pays for her travel back and forth to Calgary.

Carson, a former vice-president of marketing with the Calgary Stampede, spends her work week in Winnipeg and goes home on weekends to Alberta to be with her family. Liquor & Lotteries — which regulates gambling and the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages in Manitoba — says she pays for her travel back and forth to Calgary.

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The chairwoman of the Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries board is defending the Crown corporation’s decision to employ a senior executive who does not live full-time in the province.

The chairwoman of the Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries board is defending the Crown corporation’s decision to employ a senior executive who does not live full-time in the province.

Polly Craik says Deanne Carson, hired in April as vice-president of marketing and communications, was the best possible person for the job.

“We went through a very thorough process,” Craik said Tuesday. “Deanne was absolutely the right selection for the position, and management did the hiring certainly with the support of the board.”

Carson, a former vice-president of marketing with the Calgary Stampede, spends her work week in Winnipeg and goes home on weekends to Alberta to be with her family. Liquor & Lotteries — which regulates gambling and the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages in Manitoba — says she pays for her travel back and forth to Calgary.

Carson, a former vice-president of marketing with the Calgary Stampede, spends her work week in Winnipeg and goes home on weekends to Alberta to be with her family. Liquor & Lotteries — which regulates gambling and the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages in Manitoba — says she pays for her travel back and forth to Calgary.

“That’s just the way of the world these days,” she said. “I’ve got a business and we have five people on Zoom (video) conference calls every week from all over the place. And it’s very productive. It’s just the way that business works today.”

“I knew that when she was hired that she was already spending summers coming to Winnipeg and spending time out at the lake. So, it’s not as cut and dry as it seems to look in the article,” she said referring to a Free Press report Tuesday.

“I knew that when she was hired that she was already spending summers coming to Winnipeg and spending time out at the lake. So, it’s not as cut and dry as it seems to look in the article,” she said referring to a

Asked Tuesday whether Crown corporation executives should live in the province full-time, Premier Brian Pallister chose his words carefully.

“I think the key factor here is that we need to have the best possible people in key roles,” he said, while attending an announcement on the expansion of high-speed internet service in northern Manitoba.

“I think we in Manitoba, quite rightly, believe that we have the best place to live and work and raise a family in the country of Canada, so we’re always puzzled when people choose to live in other places, whether it’s Calgary or elsewhere,” Pallister said.

“That being said, we want the best people possible in key roles within our services. We want that to be the key priority. So, it’s balancing, I suppose, a number of factors. I expect that the board of Liquor & Lotteries will be taking a look at this issue that’s been raised. And I wait to see what their response would be.”

“That being said, we want the best people possible in key roles within our services. We want that to be the key priority. So, it’s balancing, I suppose, a number of factors. I expect that the board of Liquor & Lotteries will be taking a look at this issue that’s been raised. And I wait to see what their response would be.”

A human resources expert who helps corporations attract executive talent told the Free Press earlier this week there are personal and professional pitfalls to long-distance commutes, adding they are rarely successful over the long term.

earlier this week there are personal and professional pitfalls to long-distance commutes, adding they are rarely successful over the long term.

Manitobans appear divided on whether a person who earns a full-time public-sector paycheque should live in the province full-time — or whether the over-riding concern be to find the best possible person for the job.

Several readers, commenting on an earlier Free Press story, expressed strong views on the subject in emails and online comments.

“There is nothing wrong with commuting. It is common nowadays and just part of the ‘new normal’ in today’s smaller world. If she is doing a good job, then leave her alone,” one reader wrote.

“Why is commuting so bad?” asked another. “Politicians do it all the time… I, for one, would not like to do that but if she is OK, then who cares? People need to get into the 21st century here. If she shows up for work and does her job, does it really matter where she goes when she leaves for the day?”

One reader said they agreed someone working for a Crown corporation needs “to be invested in the community” and “should live here.”

“A key indicator on how invested one is (to me anyway) would be her driver’s licence. Is it Manitoba or is it not?” the reader said.

Said another reader: “If you don’t live full time in the city where you work full time, (your) head is never here full time. Part of you is always wishing he/she were back home with the family. So no, this situation is not in the best interest of MBLL and the province of Manitoba.”

Whenever people say, “We just don’t get many kids for Halloween anymore,” it sounds as if they think no one’s making kids these days. How about that? We ran out of kids.

Trust me, some houses are getting lots of kids. We’ve never had anything but a constant parade at the door, starting with the twilight tots who have no idea what’s going on except that it involves candy, then the jubilant grade-schoolers having the best night ever and, finally, the slightly self-conscious middle-schoolers who close out the night.

There’s always a party down the block; a fire, a pot of chili, music, chairs brought out for the last night outside before the Wall of Winter goes up the next day. Around 1 in the morning I go back out to extinguish the pumpkins, and there’s always a great, sad vacancy to the moment.

The silence. The darkness. The sense that all that spooky orange nonsense that cluttered the stores for a month has been replaced by something vast and implacable — November: the year’s tomb.

It was just another night for the kids. Fun. Nothing scary really happened. Has anything really scary ever happened?

The first: It’s the last year of high school. There is absolutely no way we’re dressing up as anything, because that’s for kids. In those days, Halloween was confined to the pee-wee demographic and had not been adopted as an excuse for adults to dress up as Sexy Russian Dossier or Comic-Book Movie Hero. Your dad did not dress up as Batman because your dad was, in a way, already Batman.

The choices for our evening entertainment were limited. The previous year, we’d all gone to see “Night of the Living Dead,” a cheap jolt of gore and nihilism. It was our introduction to the atrocities that would splash across screens for the next few decades. Apparently, we would now be required to see gibbering zombies fumble with intestines and regard it as entertainment.

Afterward in the parking lot, the Guy With the Car that had the Wicked Stereo said we should go for a drive, and being dateless guys who thought we might stumble across a candy-stripe nurse convention on the edge of town, this sounded promising.

We headed out of town, and in a few minutes we were on a dark road doing 60 and headed toward Canada. We drove for a long time, and in the back of my dutiful-son head, I was calculating the time it would be when we got back.

The driver was silent. Eventually he put an 8-track in the player. The Doors. I wasn’t a fan, but he was driving.

I saw his eyes in the rear view mirror, looking at me in the back seat. As the opening bars of the song unfurled, I realized he was going to kill us all. Worse, I would be late for curfew.

When the song was over, he turned the car around, and we were not buried in shallow graves, which is always a bonus. He wasn’t homicidal. He just wanted us to appreciate this song. I just googled him; he’s a Realtor in Mexico now.

The other night of terror occurred when I was a young myopic hobo. That was my costume, actually: shabby coat, thick black glasses for some reason. I was 5 or 6. We kids could go out on our own door-to-door then because the modern fear of Ninja Pedophiles had not yet taken hold, and parents did not suspect their neighbors had been up all night secreting razor blades in tempting apples.

Something made me decide to go around the block to try my luck over there. When you’re a little kid, the other side of the block is a strange land — a mirror of your own but utterly different, unknown.

At some point, I realized that this side of the block had a peculiar aspect: There weren’t any kids here at all.

My side — the good side, the safe side, the home side — had lots of kids. The other side was empty, as if any kid who knocked on a door was whisked inside and dunked in a cauldron. Dark. Silent. Vacant.

It’s the thing that’s supposed to happen but never does. Everything is designed for Safe Scares and Fun! But if you’re lucky, you remember a Halloween that lifted the jack-o’-lantern’s lid and showed you something you didn’t want to see. An empty street. A dark, endless road.

Then you run to the light and the warm room, and everything’s OK. That’s the lesson of Halloween: Run back to the light and the warmth. And count all the sweet things.

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On Saturday, two eminent neurologists who specialise in Alzheimer’s told how their cutting-edge research has led them to believe lifestyle tweaks can help fend off the disease. Today, and in brilliant pullouts all this week, they share the personalised plan that could change your life . . .

The first flashes of forgetfulness often start in our 50s when we find ourselves grasping for a word just out of reach, or feel frustrated when trying to remember a close friend’s name.

We all worry that these ‘senior moments’ could be an early sign of dementia. With the condition now the number one cause of death in the UK, virtually every family is blighted by some form of the illness, which, until now, has had no effective treatment or cure.

But through decades of in-depth research and tireless work with elderly communities in California we are convinced that we have found a neurological solution more effective than any medication or pill.

we are convinced that we have found a neurological solution more effective than any medication or pill.

Warning: Being inactive can have the same insidious effect as a poor diet, but regular movement and activity can be a tremendously powerful way to heal your brain and increase its strength

In Saturday’s Daily Mail, we introduced The Alzheimer’s Solution — a series of lifestyle changes powerful enough to prevent 90 per cent of Alzheimer’s cases, which can reverse debilitating symptoms and add happy, healthy years to all of our lives — which we write about in our book.

In yesterday’s paper, we highlighted the importance of diet. Our years of research have shown that decades of poor food choices harm the brain, but that switching to a brain-healthy diet can have an immediate brain-boosting effect.

Today, we will explain how being inactive can have the same insidious effect, but how regular movement and activity can be a tremendously powerful way to heal your brain and increase its strength.

Our analysis of studies and years of work with people at varying stages of cognitive impairment have proved to us that exercising regularly boosts and optimises the brain’s immune system and increases the size of its most important memory structure.

It increases the manufacture of chemicals in the brain that strengthen the connections between the cells.

Prescribed blood pressure pills do their job by causing a precipitous drop in blood pressure, but they won’t, sadly, address any of the underlying problems that caused your symptoms in the first place.

If you don’t improve your lifestyle through a healthier diet, and especially by adding exercise into the mix, your cholesterol level will continue to build up, which will keep making your blood vessels even stiffer and narrower than before.

Eventually, you could get to the stage where you will require extra medication to widen the blood vessels, and if you still fail to address the lifestyle factors that elevate your blood pressure, you’ll reach the point where no amount of medication can maintain normal blood flow.

Exercise, in contrast to medication, not only helps pump blood to your brain, but also affects the underlying pathology that causes hypertension.

Regular exercise is even able to reverse damage by rejuvenating the blood vessels and increasing levels of the chemicals that help us grow new vessels. Exercise helps keep blood pressure balanced and naturally regulated — and that is really good news for your brain.

Exercise helps you maintain a healthy weight, cuts your risk of developing diabetes and even aids sleep. But, significantly, it reduces your chances of developing Alzheimer’s — and it takes almost immediate effect.

The problem is that so many of us now live completely without movement. We’re supposed to move a lot, not sit all day.

Many of our patients say they don’t know how to be active after so many years without exercise, especially when work and family commitments make prioritising exercise so hard.

But if, like many, you think you dislike exercise, let us tell you one thing for certain — you will hate Alzheimer’s far more.

Studies show that a daily brisk walk of just 15 minutes is enough to lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s by 40 per cent.

Use the magazine which was given away in Saturday’s Daily Mail (if you haven’t got yours, call 0808 272 0808 and we’ll send you a copy) to help you personalise your exercise regime.

The charts will help you identify your strengths and limitations and ease yourself towards clear long-term activity goals.

Before you pull on your trainers, sign up to a gym or nip out to buy a puncture repair kit for your bicycle, there are some small changes we urge you to make to inject lots more movement into your everyday life.

All the research agrees that there’s little worse for your brain’s long-term health than a sedentary desk-bound life topped off by an evening slumped in front of the TV.

Anything that reduces blood flow (such as long periods of inactivity) reduces brain function, especially in the areas of the brain that govern short-term memory.

Sedentary behaviour has been repeatedly associated with many chronic diseases, including cognitive impairment, and studies show the number of hours you spend sitting is proportional to your increased risk of Alzheimer’s.

What a healthy brain needs is movement throughout the day in short bursts, ideally every hour. So the factor to address first is the number of hours you spend sitting each day.

We now have standing desks in our office (standing up is much better for your brain than sitting) and a mini exercise machine that we jump on at intervals throughout the day.

I’m too old: It can be tricky to find ways to get your heart beating fast when you have bad knees, sciatic disc problems or pain in your joints. Recumbent bikes, where you sit in a normal seat and pedal, mimic the motion of cycling but reduce pressure on the joints. If you have limitations with your legs, exercise your arms. You can also try less intense exercises such as yoga, tai chi or ballroom dancing.

I haven’t got time: Think about ways to modify your routine to include physical activity — take the stairs instead of the lift, for instance.

I hate exercise: Combine your chosen exercise with something fun — music, audiobooks, podcasts, or get-togethers with friends.

We nip out for a brisk walk most lunchtimes and we have frequent short breaks to do strengthening exercises such as press-ups and sit-ups. Now it’s completely normal for both of us to take one minute out of every hour and do as many sit-ups as possible.

At home in our living room we have a stationary bike which we use when watching TV in the evening, a set of weights and resistance bands, a mat, a small step stool (for step-ups) and enough space for press-ups and sit-ups.

You don’t need any of this equipment to get started, but you do need to do whatever it takes to incorporate more movement into your day and reduce the stagnating time spent sitting.

Aim to get into the habit of standing up to take any phone call, or, better still, walk and talk. When friends suggest meeting for coffee, suggest a walk, instead. If the weather is bad, window shopping at a large covered shopping centre works just as well.

Stop using the car for short trips, do a few sit-ups before getting out of bed and squats when you are brushing your teeth. Research has shown that leg strength in particular is linked with better cognitive function, possibly because strong legs help blood circulate up to the brain.

So, just regularly working to strengthen the legs with a few partial squats while holding on to a chair is enough to have a significant positive effect on the brain.

If you have an exercise bike, drag it out of the garage and position it in front of the TV, or pick up a mini pedal exerciser (available online for about PS20) to use under your desk, or in place of your footstool so you can get your legs going round when you’d be otherwise inactive.

Set an alert on your phone to ping every hour to remind you to run through a series of simple squats (stand up from your chair and lower yourself repeatedly so your bottom almost touches the chair before standing again), stretches, or press-ups against the wall.

This might call for a bit of creative thinking about the way you work, but it is worth investigating the possibility of a standing desk.

Manageable: Start at a pace and time slightly higher than what you think you can do, and increase by weekly increments.

Convenient: Bring your exercise bike into the sitting room, hide the TV remote, wear trainers to work.

Take the stairs rather than the lift at every possible opportunity, never sit when you can stand, never stand when you can walk, or walk slowly when you can swing your arms and walk quickly. Now, you’re ready to add proper exercise into the brain-boosting mix.

As we age, we lose brain cells and the connections between them weaken and fail. A lot of evidence, however, shows that aerobic exercise (which raises your heart rate) can enhance connectivity throughout the brain, improve thinking power and protect against dementia in general and Alzheimer’s in particular.

Aerobic activity seems to boost not just the number of connections, but the strength and connectivity of each of them, and is crucial if you are going to be able to recall memories as you get older. If too many connections fail, you’ll lose your cherished memories for ever.

We now know that the brain can continue to grow into middle and even older age and exercise appears to be the most significant lifestyle factor when it comes to generating new cells in the brain. Studies show that any movement — even fidgeting — triggers the synthesis of chemicals which act like fertiliser for the brain cells.

Having strong muscles, and using weights or adding a little bit of resistance training should, ideally, form part of your exercise mix, too.

Everything we know about the brain suggests that complex activities provide the best protection against cognitive decline. Netball or basketball won’t just get the blood pumping, they’ll strengthen your reflexes, balance and co- ordination and challenge your brain.

Even playing on a Nintendo Wii offers a constantly changing interface that keeps the brain engaged and can be a great alternative for those who get bored with bikes and treadmills.

Studies show weight training improves reasoning and attention skills and stops the formation of cholesterol plaques, thereby increasing the supply of essential nutrients to the brain.

It is too easy to make excuses and wriggle out of exercise, but protecting your brain against Alzheimer’s requires exercise to be a priority. Commit to doing some form of movement every day. It doesn’t matter if you’re walking, jogging, cycling, dancing, swimming, nipping up and down the stairs, doing star jumps or repeatedly stepping on and off your bottom step.

If you really don’t feel in the mood, start doing something anyway, and do it for at least five minutes. Any exercise is better than none.

We have found with our patients that the best results occur when activity, movement and exercise become completely habitual and intertwined with your daily life.

Adapted from The Alzheimer’s Solution: A Revolutionary Guide To How You Can Prevent And Reverse Memory Loss by Dr Dean Sherzai and Dr Ayesha Sherzai, published by Simon & Schuster on October 5 at PS14.99. Order a copy for PS10.49 (valid until October 7, 2017) at mailbookshop.co.uk or call 0844 571 0640. Free P&P; on orders over PS15.

For a great way to get started with your new activity programme, try these basic exercises you can do in your living room:

Choose one of these balance exercises and do it every day. Before your balance improves, or if you don’t feel too steady, you can do them with a chair next to you for extra support in case you need it.

Heel-to-toe walk: Walk in a straight line, placing the heel of one foot directly in front of the toes of the other foot — don’t look at your feet.

Single leg balance: Raise one leg, bringing the knee forwards and up, and hold for 10-12 seconds. Lower and switch legs.

Back leg raises: Raise one leg, pushing the knee backwards and up, and hold for 10-12 seconds. Lower and switch legs.

Side leg raises: Raise one leg, extending it sideways, and hold for 10-12 seconds. Lower and switch legs.

Tree pose: Stand with your back to the wall and lift one leg, resting your foot above or below the knee of the standing leg. Lift your arms in the air. As your balance improves try stepping away from the wall and closing your eyes while doing it.

Stretching or flexibility exercises are an important part of any physical activity programme and an important step to protect you from injury.

First, warm up with a few minutes of gentle walking. Then hold each stretch for 10-30 seconds. Repeat each one 3-5 times.

Shoulder and back stretch: Interlace your fingers and raise your arms above your head with your palms facing the ceiling. Extend your elbows and press your arms upwards.

Shoulder rotator stretch: Bend your right elbow and place your arm behind your back with your palm facing away from you.

Holding a towel with your left hand, extend that arm over the back of your head. Slowly bend your left elbow, bringing your left hand towards your right hand. Take hold of both ends of the towel firmly.

Wrist stretch: Rotate the wrists in circles, both clockwise and anticlockwise. Extend your arm and use your opposite hand to stretch your fingers both upwards and downwards.

Lower back stretch: Sit on the ground with your back upright and your legs extended straight in front of you .

Hip stretch: Stand upright. Circle your hips in each direction. Then, extend your torso to each side, lengthening your waist.

Hamstring stretch: Stand upright. Bend at your waist, lengthening your torso over the fronts of your thighs, reaching down with your arms towards your toes.

Ankle stretch: Rotate your ankles in each direction. While seated, use your hand to stretch your foot upwards, downwards and to the left and right.

To effectively exercise your short-term memory, you should aim to use emotional links, association and repetition. The more senses you involve while you memorise things, the better.

Stories are also integral to memory and linking them can be a powerful tool in building memory. Read the list below once, cover the newspaper, and jot down as many items you can remember.

Then try the techniques below, which instantly boost your ability to memorise . . . read the list once more, and do the task again.

This powerful exercise combines four different thought processes to create memorable scenes which enhance memory. It’s quite simple — just remember ACES and make the game as silly and emotional as you can (it helps build your brain power):

C onnect. Associate that information with other related things using something that will make the information distinctive.

onnect. Associate that information with other related things using something that will make the information distinctive.

Let’s say you’re trying to memorise the words ‘apple’ and ‘peacock’. Here’s an example of how to use ACES:

Senses: See the peacocks’ vibrant green feathers, touch their elaborate tails, hear them chirping and say ‘peacock’.

This strategy uses a familiar room to help you memorise a list of items — let’s say you choose your bedroom: as you enter, you see a bed with four pillows, a table, a floor lamp and a large window. When you’re memorising a list, simply associate each item with an object or place in your bedroom.

Your bed is in front of you, and you notice that your bedding is glaringly white because you used laundry whitener to wash it.

Choose a specific object that you see regularly — your favorite necklace or painting perhaps — and imagine it in great detail. See all aspects of the object. Hold all those thoughts in your head, maintaining your focus on that object for at least three minutes.

We have a limited capacity to memorise a list but ‘chunking’ items by category or association can make things more effective.

Try ‘chunking’ the list above into four categories: six types of fruit, four office supplies, seven cleaning supplies and four kitchen items.

Sticky tape: Mary is known for being organised, so imagine as you enter a room she is taping a large ‘to do’ list on the wall.

Sticky notes: Mary writes on sticky notes and adds them to her list — she’s almost run out of room.

Heat the olive oil in a pan and fry the chorizo (if using) on a high heat for 2-3 minutes, stirring regularly.

Turn the heat down and add chopped onion. Saute over a low heat for 10 minutes until soft. Add garlic, paprika and chilli flakes and cook for a further 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the tinned tomatoes and vegetable stock and season. Let this simmer for 10 minutes to let the flavours develop and create a sauce.

Add the beans and cook for 5 minutes, before adding the greens, lemon and parsley. Put the lid on, let the greens wilt for a couple of minutes and serve.

Simmer for 10 minutes, stirring regularly and adding more water if it looks like it is drying out. The pasta cooks in the water with the other ingredients and makes its own sauce.

When the pasta is nearly cooked, throw in the spinach and squeeze in lemon juice, cover and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. Serve with an extra drizzle of olive oil. Add chilli, olives or capers to taste.

Heat oil in a saucepan over a low heat and saute spring onions, chilli and garlic for 5 minutes until soft.

Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse. Add vegetables and cook for 2-3 minutes or until cooked through. Add rice, soy sauce and lime juice and stir well.

Mix quinoa, sweetcorn, egg, flour, baking powder, salt, pepper and chilli in a bowl. Add chopped spinach and mix again. Heat olive oil in a frying pan and spoon the mixture into the pan (this mix will make 4 good-sized fritters). Fry each side for 2-3 minutes until golden brown.

Table of Contents Important Safeguards 2 – 5 Overview Control and Features 7 – 11 Getting Started 12 – 14 Pressure Cooking 15 – 17 Non-Pressure Cooking 18 – 21 Cooking and Safety Tips Care and Cleaning Troubleshooting 24 – 26 Warranty 27, 28 Pictures in manual are for reference only.

Important Safeguards SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS When using pressure cookers, basic safety precautions should always be followed. 1) Do not touch hot surfaces of pressure cooker. Use side handles for carrying. 2) Do not place the cooker on or near a hot gas or electric burner, or in a heated oven. 3) Intended for countertop use only.

See “Getting Started” pages 12-14. 18) Use of accessories and parts that are not branded Instant Pot(r) or recommended by the Instant Pot(r) Company may cause the cooker to malfunction. Cook only in Instant Pot(r)…

Important Safeguards 20) Always check the steam release valve, float valve and anti-block shield for clogging before use. When in operation or releasing pressure DO NOT place Do not move cooker when unprotected skin over the steam release valve. it is in operation …

Weight Dimensions Supply Power 120V~ 33 x 31 x 32 cm 6.75 kg 15.7x 23.9cm DUO Plus 1000 W 6 quart 60Hz 13 x 12.2 x 12.6 in. 14.8 lbs 6.2 x 9.4 in. Working Pressure: Low Pressure: 5.8 – 7.2 PSI (40 – 50 kPa); High Pressure: 10.2 – 11.6 PSI (70 – 80 kPa) …

Overview Steam release handle Anti-block shield Lid handle Float valve To install: Position the anti-block shield in place and Lid position push down Lid fin marker Stainless steel inner pot To remove: Using your thumb, push the side of the anti-block shield towards the lid rim and Cooker lift up with some effort.

Control and Features Control Panel The control panel of your Instant Pot(r) DUO Plus consists of a large LCD display, cooking program keys, operations keys to control pressure level, + / – to adjust cooking time and a Cancel button.

Control and Features Control Panel Instant Pot(r) is a programmed smart cooker that has preset cooking instructions for different food ingredients and cooking methods. It also remembers your most recent setting per cooking program for a more personalized cooking experience.

Control and Features Cooking Program Options Notes for Users Programs Modes Cooking Options Soup without meat. Less The soup/broth remains clear due to lack of boiling Normal Soup with meat. motion under pressure cooking. More Rich bone broth. Soft texture. Less Choose different modes based on the meat texture…

Notes for Users Non-pressure cooking Less Corresponds to LOW setting program. You may also use in a temperature controlled the Instant Pot(r) glass lid as slow cooker. an option. Normal Corresponds to MEDIUM setting in a temperature controlled slow cooker.

+ / – keys to favourite recipes or cooking change cooking time. More habits. **Please refer to ‘USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning’ for details. The DUO Plus has not been tested by USDA for food safety in pressure canning.**…

Getting Started Read warning card and warning stickers. Remove all packaging materials and warning stickers from the cooker and accessories. Clean the inner pot, lid and accessories with water and detergent before the first use. Install the condensation collector at the rear of the cooker by aligning the top of the collector with the guides on the cooker and press in.

Getting Started Before using your Instant Pot(r): To remove the lid, hold the handle, turn the lid counterclockwise and lift. Remove the inner pot from the cooker. Add food and liquids to the inner pot as the recipe directs. If steaming, place the steamer rack on the bottom of the inner pot first.

* Do not put the lid on for Saute program. Initial Test Run To familiarize yourself with the Instant Pot(r) and check if the cooker is working properly: Add 3 cups of water into the inner pot using the plastic measuring cup provided.

Pressure Cooking The following pressure cooking programs are available: Pressure Cook, Rice, Soup/Broth, Meat/Stew, Bean/Chili, Multigrain, Porridge, Cake, Egg, Sterilize and Steam. * Do not fill the inner pot more than 2/3 full. For food that expands during cooking such as rice or dried vegetables, do not fill the inner pot more than 1/2 full.

Pressure Cooking Optionally, personalize pressure cooking programs as follows: To do this ..Press this button Followed by these steps… Change the cooking time Cooking Program Select between three preset cooking times, Key of Your Choice Normal, Less and More by repeatedly pressing the cooking program you wish to adjust.

Pressure Cooking Release the pressure using one of the following methods (refer to recipe): Natural Release: Allow the cooker to cool down naturally until the float valve drops down. This may take 10 to 40 minutes, or even more, depending on the amount of food in the cooker.

Non-Pressure Cooking The following non-pressure cooking programs are available: Saute, Slow Cook, Yogurt and Keep Warm. Sauteing Connect the power cord. The LCD displays OFF, indicating that the cooker is on standby. Select the Saute program. To change the cooking temperature, press Saute repeatedly to select between Normal (for regular browning), Less (for simmering or thickening sauce) and More (for stir-frying or blackening meat).

Non-Pressure Cooking Slow Cook You may use the Instant Pot glass lid as an option. If using the pressure cooking lid, make sure the steam release handle is turned to Venting. Connect the power cord. The LCD displays OFF, indicating that the cooker is on standby.

Non-Pressure Cooking When the cooking cycle has finished, the cooker beeps and enters the Keep Warm mode if the Keep Warm program is turned ON. The LCD displays the elapsed time (such as 00:02). After 24 hours, the cooker turns off. If the lid is on, remove it by turning counterclockwise and lifting.

Non-Pressure Cooking Add Starter Culture a) Add starter culture to the warm milk in the inner pot. b) Replace the inner pot and close the lid. The steam release handle can be left in Venting or Sealing position. Ferment Yogurt a) Select the Yogurt program.

Safety and Cooking Tips * Extreme caution should be taken when moving the steam release handle to Venting position. Keep hands and face away from the steam release openings. Failure to comply may result in scalding or serious injury. * Do not open the lid until pressure inside the cooker is completely released. As a safety feature, until the float valve drops down the lid is locked and cannot be opened.

Care and Cleaning Unplug your Instant Pot(r) and let it cool to room temperature before cleaning. * Both the inner pot and lid are dishwasher safe. * Remove the inner pot and lid and wash with detergent. Rinse with clear water and wipe dry with a soft cloth.

Troubleshooting If you experience any problem with the cooker, please DO NOT return the product to the retail store or online merchant. For technical assistance and product return information: * Create a support ticket: www.InstantPot.com/support/ * Email: support@instantpot.com * Call 1800 828 7280 for the customer care team. You can also find tips, videos and FAQs on www.InstantPot.com/faq/ The issues in the following tables do not always indicate a faulty cooker.

Troubleshooting Problem Possible reason Solution No sealing ring Install the sealing ring Steam leaks from the side of the lid Sealing ring damaged Replace the sealing ring Food debris attached to the Clean the sealing ring sealing ring Open then close the lid Lid not closed properly again Food debris on the float…

Troubleshooting Solution Problem Possible reason All LCDs flash with a Faulty temperature sensor Contact support online code appearing on Faulty temperature sensor Contact support online screen and the warning beep is ON Temperature is too high Insert the inner pot because inner pot is not properly placed into the cooker base…

When this appliance is operated and maintained in accordance with written instructions attached to or furnished with the product, Instant Pot Company will pay for either (i) repair labor to correct defects in materials or workmanship that existed when this appliance was purchased or (ii), at its sole and exclusive discretion, replace the appliance for a period of one (1) year from the date of purchase.

Warranty Registration and Service Please visit to register your new Instant Pot and validate your warranty within thirty (30) days of purchase. You will be asked to provide the store name, date of purchase and model number (found on the base of your cooker) along with your name and address.

Telephone: +1 800 828-7280 Fax: +1 (613) 800-0726 Web: www.InstantPot.com Europe Email: support@instantpot.co.uk US and Canada E-mail: support@instantpot.com To enhance your experience with Instant Pot(r), join the official Instant Pot Community Facebook.com/groups/instantpotcommunity twitter.com/instantpot Instant Pot(r) Free Recipe App & More…

Telephone: +1 800 828-7280 Fax: +1 (613) 800-0726 Web: www.InstantPot.com Europe Email: support@instantpot.co.uk US and Canada E-mail: support@instantpot.com To enhance your experience with Instant Pot(r), join the official Instant Pot Community Facebook.com/groups/instantpotcommunity twitter.com/instantpot Instant Pot(r) Free Recipe App & More…

.” data-reactid=”23″>This winter H&M; is doing away with the street-chic and going straight for the tea-sipping fancy, and we’re feeling it. To usher in this year’s winter looks, the clothing company teamed up with the luxurious Canadian and Turkish fashion designer Erdem Moralioglu for the stunning

, sequin slip dresses, and sleeveless ball gowns. It’s a true collection of wearable poetry. The collaboration with the designer includes roughly 35 women’s styles with 10-15 accessories, and 20 men’s styles.” data-reactid=”24″>The

, sequin slip dresses, and sleeveless ball gowns. It’s a true collection of wearable poetry. The collaboration with the designer includes roughly 35 women’s styles with 10-15 accessories, and 20 men’s styles.

The intricate prints travel the full color-wheel in this collection, and there are even puffed sleeves and silky black bows.

The collection will launch online and in select H&M; stores on November 2nd, so prepare your wallet.

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By now there’s probably someone in your office raving about their new Instant Pot, the kitchen appliance that’s a combination pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, steamer and yogurt maker that will also keep your food warm and saute meats and veggies.

“It’s life-changing, and I can make chili with dried beans in an hour,” one co-worker marvelled. “I always make my mom’s Portuguese chicken soup with it,” said another.

The Instant Pot Community Facebook group has more than 400,000 members sharing recipes, hacks, videos and for some of the more hardcore users, pictures of rolling carts dedicated for the Instant Pot, the appliance decked out in decals for a personalized touch and recommendations on what bags built specifically to carry the Instant Pot is best. This week, an “authorized” Instant Pot special issue recipe magazine hit the newsstands.

The Instant Pot’s story began during the 2008 economic bust when Robert Wang, a laid-off Ottawa telecom engineer, made a 180-degree turn in his career and looked at household appliances. With nary a marketing plan and a staff of only 25, two million Instant Pots have since landed on kitchen counters, mainly from word of mouth raves, and spurred an industry of Instant Pot-heads with their own cookbooks and fan clubs.

At least part of its genius is it helped home cooks get over the one enduring fear of pressure cookers — the kablooey factor.

“Why smartphones succeed is that they have nine to 10 sensors whether it’s in the camera or screens. I thought what if we added more censors to the pressure cooker? We can make it safer, provide consistency and automation,” says Wang, the 53-year-old CEO of Ottawa-based Double Insight, the company behind the Instant Pot.

It’s obvious that Wang comes from a tech background and not a culinary one. He spoke more about consistency, efficiency and simplicity than flavour or texture.

Wang worked at the research arm for the now-defunct Canadian telecommunications company Nortel from the mid-90s to 2000, right around the time the tech bubble burst. He moved on to form another telecom start-up with another colleague that raised millions in venture capital, but that too ended with another burst: the subprime mortgage crises of 2008.

“I thought it was impossible to do high tech because funding was becoming a serious problem,” Wang says. “I thought we should look into the consumer space, specifically kitchen appliances.”

Wang and his colleagues looked into the electrical pressure cooker, which was gaining popularity as people were cooking more rather than dining out, but wanted a meal that was also healthy and fast. A pressure cooker works by creating an airtight seal in the cooker, building pressure inside the pot and forcing hot steam into the food, rendering the toughest meats into a tender, juicy meal in a fraction of the time it would take in the slow cooker or oven.

The Instapot works in the same way, but sets itself apart from other pressure cookers with additional features like slow cooker, rice cooker yogurt maker, and saute.

The first Instant Pot went on sale in 2010 with subsequent models released every 12 to 18 months, each with incremental improvements such as an added yogurt-making function; presets for different foods; accessories like a rack for eggs and in the newest fourth generation model: bluetooth capability. The Instant Pot also eased fears of the notorious pressure cooker by incorporating more safety features that make the machine far less temperamental than its stovetop predecessors.

“In high tech, you improve your project on a continuous basis,” Wang says, adding that four new Instant Pot models are scheduled for release this year along with an improved recipe app. “We listen to our customers closely and we have a page on our site where people can submit ideas.”

To promote it, the company gave free Instant Pots to influential food bloggers and recipe developers to test, but it was Amazon’s rankings and reviews that Wang used to track success: January 2013 was the tipping point when the second-generation model ranked higher than all other stovetop pressure cookers on Amazon’s bestseller list.

With more than 2,000 reviews averaging 4.5 out of 5 stars on its bestseller third-generation model, it’s an endorsement better than any ad the company could buy. Fans released Instant Pot cookbooks, a Facebook group called Instant Pot Recipes 101 has 17,000 members, and thousands of Instant Pot cooking videos can be found on YouTube.

Pressure cooking does have limits, however. If you want the golden, crispy and slightly charred skin on your chicken or potatoes, stick to an oven. Pressure cookers also need 10 to 15 minutes for the pressure to build, and another 5 to 10 for the pressure to release before it’s safe to lift the lid, so while risotto takes five minutes to cook, in total it’s more of a 30-minute venture. Still, fans love it for the consistent results and ability to step away from the kitchen while it’s cooking.

For now, Double Insight is in the midst of expanding as its product is quickly becoming a household name like Crockpot or KitchenAid. The company is planning to double its workforce to 50 employees over the next year to keep up with the continuous need to innovate. Other appliances are in the works but what will be the followup to the Instant Pot, Wang is unsurprisingly tight-lipped.

“We want to reimagine the kitchen and apply the same technology to other appliances,” says Wang. “The Instant Pot isn’t the be-all-and-end-all product.”

This classic Italian rice dish is what Instant Pot devotees say sold them on the gadget. There’s no need to keep an eye on the pot or constant stirring, perfect for parents with tykes running around. This recipe is has been adapted from Serious Eats’ recipe for Pressure Cooker Mushroom Risotto.

Using Saute function on “normal” setting, heat oil and butter. Stir until butter is melted and bubbly. Add mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. Stir occasionally until mushrooms are browned and excess moisture has cooked off, about 15 minutes depending on variety of mushrooms.

Add onions and garlic. Stir frequently until onions are soft, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add rice and stir until grains are lightly toasted but not browned (centre of rice will remain opaque but edges will turn translucent). Stir in miso paste and soy sauce. Add wine and stir frequently until alcohol smell has cooked off, about 2 minutes.

Press “Keep Warm/Cancel” button. Add broth. Secure lid on Instant Pot, making sure valve is switched to “Sealing” mode. Cook risotto on Manual setting for 5 minutes at low pressure.

When time is up, carefully pull release valve and let steam escape until float valve drops to indicate lid is safe to remove.

Remove lid. Stir to let remaining liquid evaporate. Taste. Add salt and pepper, if necessary. Stir in parmesan and peas. Transfer to serving plates and garnish with parsley.

The pressure cooker makes quick work of dried beans, making this chili a simple hearty meal for busy nights.

Chilis and stews are go-to meals for Instapot users since dried beans can be cooked in less than an hour without an overnight soak. This is an updated version of my turkey chili recipe with cocoa powder and coffee added in. It sounds odd but it gives the chili added depth and smoky flavour.

Using Saute function on “normal” setting, heat oil and saute meat until no longer pink. Add onion and garlic. Stir until meat is browned and onions have softened, about 2 minutes.

Add diced red pepper and corn. Stir in tomato paste, Italian seasoning, Worcestershire sauce, sugar, coffee, cocoa, cumin and cayenne until incorporated. Press “Keep Warm/Cancel” button. Add canned tomato (including liquid) with dried beans.

Secure lid on pot, making sure valve is on “Sealing” setting. Turn on “Bean/Chili” function and cook for 50 minutes on high pressure.

When time is up, allow natural pressure release, about 15 minutes. Remove lid and stir chili. If chili is to runny, turn on Saute function to cook off excess liquid till chili reaches desired thickness.

Pulled pork gets whipped up quickly in a pressure cooker, and topping this recipe with a simple sauce completes the tasty tacos.

Pork shoulder is a popular cut for pressure cooking since it can render the tough and relatively affordable piece of meat into juicy pulled pork in an hour (it would take five to seven in a slow cooker). When cooking large cuts of meats, it’s recommended to let the pressure cooker depressurize on its own time rather than pulling the quick release valve. This ensures the meat stays tender.

Gochujang, fermented Korean chili paste, and gochugaru, Korean chili flakes can be found at Asian grocers or the Asian aisle at the supermarket.

The pork can be served on rice, in tacos, or in a bun with slaw, but I like serving it in steamed baos, found in the refrigerate section of Asian grocers. They take 15 minutes to steam. This recipe will fill about 20 baos.

Using Saute function on “normal” setting, heat oil. In batches, brown meat on all sides till golden brown. Remove all pork from pot. Saute onion, garlic and ginger in rendered fat till soft. Add broth to deglaze pot, scraping bottom of pot with a wooden spatula to loosen bits of caramelized pork. Press “Keep Warm/Cancel” button. Return pork to pot.

Secure lid on pot, making sure valve is on “Sealing” setting. Turn on Manual function and cook for 50 minutes on high pressure.

When time is up, let cooker depressurize naturally, about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove lid and check if pork is fork tender. If not, replace lid and cook on high pressure for another 10 minutes.

Transfer pork to a large bowl. Discard bones and skin. Shred meat with two forks. Toss pork in gochujang sauce. Serve immediately with rice, in tacos, in soft burger buns or steamed baos.

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